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Aug 31, 2014 / 37 notes
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Yesterday we discussed some of the basic mechanics of a frisbee in flight. Although frisbees do generate lift similarly to a wing, they do have some unique features. You’ve probably noticed, for example, that the top surface of a frisbee has several raised concentric rings. These are not simply decoration! Instead the rings disrupt airflow at the surface of the frisbee. This actually creates a narrow region of separated flow, visible in region B on the left oil-flow image. Airflow reattaches to the frisbee in the image after the second black arc, and the boundary layer along region C remains turbulent and attached for the remaining length of the frisbee. Keeping the boundary layer attached over the top surface ensures low pressure so that the disk has plenty of lift and remains aerodynamically stable in flight. A smooth frisbee would be much harder to throw accurately because its flight would be very sensitive to angle of attack and likely to stall. (Image credits: J. Potts and W. Crowther; recommended papers by: V. Morrison and R. Lorentz)
Aug 30, 2014 / 425 notes

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Yesterday we discussed some of the basic mechanics of a frisbee in flight. Although frisbees do generate lift similarly to a wing, they do have some unique features. You’ve probably noticed, for example, that the top surface of a frisbee has several raised concentric rings. These are not simply decoration! Instead the rings disrupt airflow at the surface of the frisbee. This actually creates a narrow region of separated flow, visible in region B on the left oil-flow image. Airflow reattaches to the frisbee in the image after the second black arc, and the boundary layer along region C remains turbulent and attached for the remaining length of the frisbee. Keeping the boundary layer attached over the top surface ensures low pressure so that the disk has plenty of lift and remains aerodynamically stable in flight. A smooth frisbee would be much harder to throw accurately because its flight would be very sensitive to angle of attack and likely to stall. (Image credits: J. Potts and W. Crowther; recommended papers by: V. Morrison and R. Lorentz)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Frisbees are a popular summertime toy, but they involve some pretty neat physics, too. Two key ingredients to their long flight times are their lift generation and spin. A frisbee in flight behaves very much like a wing, generating lift by flying at an angle of attack. This angle of attack and the curvature of the disk rim cause air to accelerate over the top of the leading edge. Airflow over the top of the disk is faster than that across the bottom;  thus, pressure is lower over the top of the frisbee and lift is generated. Aerodynamic lift and drag aren’t enough to keep the frisbee aloft long, though. Spin matters, too. If the frisbee is launched without spin, gravity acts on it through its center of mass, but lift and drag act through a point off-center because lift tends to be higher on the front of the disk than the back. This offset between gravitational forces and aerodynamic forces creates a torque that tends to flip the frisbee. By spinning the frisbee, the thrower gives it a high angular momentum acting about its spin axis. Now instead of flipping the disk, the torque caused by the offset forces just tips the angular momentum vector slightly. Physically, this is known as spin stabilization or gyroscopic stability. Tomorrow we’ll take a closer look at airflow over the frisbee.  (Image credit: A. Leibel and C. Pugh, source video; recommended papers by: V. Morrison and R. Lorentz)
Aug 30, 2014 / 495 notes

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Frisbees are a popular summertime toy, but they involve some pretty neat physics, too. Two key ingredients to their long flight times are their lift generation and spin. A frisbee in flight behaves very much like a wing, generating lift by flying at an angle of attack. This angle of attack and the curvature of the disk rim cause air to accelerate over the top of the leading edge. Airflow over the top of the disk is faster than that across the bottom;  thus, pressure is lower over the top of the frisbee and lift is generated. Aerodynamic lift and drag aren’t enough to keep the frisbee aloft long, though. Spin matters, too. If the frisbee is launched without spin, gravity acts on it through its center of mass, but lift and drag act through a point off-center because lift tends to be higher on the front of the disk than the back. This offset between gravitational forces and aerodynamic forces creates a torque that tends to flip the frisbee. By spinning the frisbee, the thrower gives it a high angular momentum acting about its spin axis. Now instead of flipping the disk, the torque caused by the offset forces just tips the angular momentum vector slightly. Physically, this is known as spin stabilization or gyroscopic stability. Tomorrow we’ll take a closer look at airflow over the frisbee.  (Image credit: A. Leibel and C. Pugh, source video; recommended papers by: V. Morrison and R. Lorentz)

Aug 30, 2014 / 614 notes
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guidetrainlove:

© Andrew Gnezdilov
Aug 26, 2014 / 394 notes

guidetrainlove:

© Andrew Gnezdilov

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Aug 25, 2014 / 2,389 notes
keng001:

Sacha Maurice Leyendecker (via Where Professional Models Meet Model Photographers - ModelMayhem)
Aug 24, 2014 / 22 notes
Aug 18, 2014 / 365 notes
animalics:

Not Just Mans Best Friend
Aug 18, 2014 / 16 notes

animalics:

Not Just Mans Best Friend

Aug 18, 2014 / 3 notes
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Lacivert
Aug 18, 2014 / 85 notes

Lacivert

alexandra-sousaa:

http://alexandra-sousaa.tumblr.com/

Lacivert
Aug 17, 2014 / 14 notes
alexandra-sousaa:

http://alexandra-sousaa.tumblr.com/
Aug 17, 2014 / 49 notes